One Time the Film Was Better than the Book (Yes I said It)

The Perks of Being a Wallflower (film) - Wikipedia

The book is always better than the film, right? That’s a rule I almost always live by. But there are some exceptions (I binged the Netflix version of Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events during lockdown, and I hate to admit I preferred it to the books. At least in this, Snicket’s lengthy explanations of words are read by Patrick Warburton in weird costumes.). Last week, I watched The Perks of Being a Wallflower for the first time; I didn’t really have high expectations after reading the book. For me, the tone of the book was good, but I didn’t connect with the characters. It had a good plot, but I was left feeling down – and a bit confused. But the film?

The film was amazing.

*Cue dramatic intro music*

Perks Of Being A Wallflower Patrick Quotes. QuotesGram

I’m struggling to pinpoint my favourite part. Everything was just clearer, without spelling out the obvious, in a way that the book lacked significantly. Often contemporary books leave you to read between the lines, but when I’m googling ‘what the hell Aunt Helen did’, I think it’s gone a bit far. Some sections of the book felt corny; often monologues about life and love feel much better put to music and a montage of friends laughing silently. Although, I’m still not sure about the whole ‘we are infinite thing’, from my experience (and trust me) it’s not really the sort of thing that a 15 year old would say.

Which brings me to my next problem: how old is Charlie? I’m english, and I get a bit confused sometimes about the whole grade system – although I’m sure it’s vice versa. I’m pretty sure Charlie is only 14/15… and he doesn’t act it. The handsome, older teen Hollywood had cast didn’t fit the Charlie in my head, although Logan Lerman was a good enough actor. However, Ezra Miller was totally the Patrick i’d envisioned; this was the first film Emma Watson had starred in since Harry Potter (we love Emma Watson). It’s certainly not about a magical school, but I really enjoyed The Perks of Being a Wallflower – I’d be interested to read the book again and see how it compares. If you know any other great coming-of-age type films, or just good book adaptations, please like and let me know in the comments!

The Perks of Being a Wallflower in 5 Photos


Are you not sure what books to read for summer? Would you like to take part in a really simple and fun Reading Challenge?

Find the prompts here, and then borrow, buy, steal or ebook books to fit them. I’d love for as many people as possible to take part in my first original book tag. Happy Reading!

Published by Hundreds&Thousands

I’m a teenager (and Hufflepuff) from Manchester. I like oversized jumpers, music that isn't on the radio anymore, and books. Honestly, any books I can get my hands on but my personal favourites are fantasy, mystery or your classic teen romance (it’s ironic I know but you can’t really go wrong with 'Eleanor and Park'). And one day, I decided to try and share some of my opinions on some great – and not so great – books to people around the world. And here it is! I really enjoy it; I hope you do too. The aim is hundreds and thousands of books (see what I did there?) but I’m not quite up to that. Yet.

8 thoughts on “One Time the Film Was Better than the Book (Yes I said It)

  1. I think understanding of this story is the combination of both movie and book. I first watched movie and then book, and I liked the book. Whichever comes last, just fills the gap and becomes ideal choice. Great review by the way.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. You’re right. Charlie seemed too mature for his age. I mean to be realistic they’re really isn’t anyone at that age who talks and thinks like that. Great post! I wished I would have read this when I was younger to be able to compare it from today’s age.

    Liked by 1 person

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